THINK LUXURY, THINK SILK !

Hello fabric lovers,

So where were we? Ah, yes we posted on denim last week and we hope you liked it. It’s all about silk this week!

Silk is a soft, lustrous fiber taken from the cocoon of the silkworm.

Sericulture has a long history unknown to most people. For centuries the West knew very little about silk and the people who made it. Chinese legend gives the title Goddess of Silk to Lady Hsi-Ling-Shih, wife of the mythical Yellow Emperor, who was said to have ruled China in about 3000 BC. For more than two thousand years the Chinese kept the secret of silk altogether to themselves.

In spite of their secrecy however the Chinese were destined to lose their monopoly on silk production. Sericulture reached Korea around 200 BC, when waves of Chinese immigrants arrived there. Silk reached the West through a number of different channels. Shortly after AD 300, sericulture traveled westward and the cultivation of the silkworm was established in India. By the sixth century the Persians too had mastered the art of silk weaving, developing their own rich patterns and techniques. Italy began silk production with the introduction of 2000 skilled silk weavers from Constantinople. Eventually silk production became widespread in Europe.

World silk production has approximately doubled during the last 30 years in spite of man-made fibers replacing silk for some uses. China and Japan during this period have been the two main producers. China, the country that first developed sericulture thousands years ago dramatically increased its silk production and has again become the world’s leading producer of silk.

You can find any number of the material in the market like chiffon fabric, china silk, cotton silk, crape silk and satin silk but they are all chemically made. There are mainly four types of natural silk fabrics- Mulberry silk, taser silk, muga silk and eri silk . Among these mulberry silk is the most popular and expensive one. Among all the fabrics available silk is one of the most expensive and rich fabric.

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